Youth Forward Scholarship Winter 2017 – Saving my mother

Name: Hafso Muse
From: Fridley, Minnesota
Grade: 10th
School: Al-Amal school
Votes: 0

When
I first started volunteering at my mother’s workplace, our local
daycare, I didn’t do much except tell kids to be quiet or clean. It
wasn’t until I noticed a kid struggling with homework that the idea
of tutoring popped into my mind. Most of the kids at our local
daycare are from low-income communities, and their parents had never
went to school. Consequently, homework was a challenge and getting
help was rarely an option for the parents lacked the resources.
Familiar with the struggle, I started tutoring as many as I could and
started a small homework help group. This activity hits close to home
because I was once one of those kids. Being able to do what I wish
someone had done for me made this activity meaningful. 

 

 I
think the greatest robbery is that of the potential of millions of
kids due to lack of education. At sixteen, my mother was coerced into
an arranged marriage and forced to leave her studies. As a result, I
have watched her struggle through life working at assembly lines for
a minimum wage. It is her struggle as a single mother without a
degree that motivates me to give back to the community and give
educational opportunities and resources to kids who have none.

Every
week, I would spend seven to six hours at my local daycare each
afternoon from Friday to Sunday. It helped that my mother worked at
the place because I could just tag along but it was those kids and
their excitement at getting a problem right that motivated me to go
every afternoon. My volunteering activities followed me to school. As
soon as I went back to school in tenth grade, I started a GirlUp club
to raise funds and awareness for girl’s education. I also started a
books and Chocolate book club for girls in younger grades because
books were my source of academic success. Being able to share my
passion with these girls and watch them write their own stories was
the greatest source of happiness. Knowing you’re making a
difference is the most fulfilling feeling in the world.

Over
the years, I have learned to appreciate the privileges I have. I have
a mother who understand the importance of education and unlike the
girls supported by GirlUp, I get to go to school every day. In the
future, I hope to start a nonprofit school for girls in Mogadishu,
Somalia. The school will be based on a lottery system so everyone has
an equal chance at admittance. Eligibility will be open to orphans
and low-income communities to give resources to the least privileged.
I also hope to run for Congress to lower student debt because
education should free people from financial burden not add to it.


For me, forward looking means
looking out for future generation.
Education
transgresses time and passes from one generation to another.
Educating one individual could lift a whole a family from poverty and
give future nations access to new opportunities. I see education as a
garden worth investing in for its fruits multiply with every
individual you teach. If I manage to change the course of history for
one family or save one person like my mother from a life of hardship,
I will have fulfilled my purpose in the world.


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