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Preview: 2023 Kia Sportage takes on dramatic look

Preview: 2023 Kia Sportage takes on dramatic look

A redesigned Kia Sportage is coming for the 2023 model year, and Kia on Wednesday provided U.S. specs on the vehicle that will go on sale in the first quarter of 2022.
The redesigned Sportage has taken on a dramatic new look, with elements like a clamshell hood up front and the pinched leading edge of the tailgate looking similar to what we see on Kia’s new EV6 electric crossover introduced for 2022. And like most new Kias, there’s a grille spanning the width of the vehicle’s face. Another interesting element are the matrix LED headlights, whose main clusters are set low in the face and bounded by boomerang-shaped daytime lights. The available wheel sizes measure between 17 and 19 inches in diameter.
Inside is a premium design that wouldn’t look out of place in an Audi. Present is a driver-orientated dash layout dominated by a curved display integrating separate 12.3-inch screens for the instrument cluster and infotainment.
2023 Kia Sportage2023 Kia Sportage (European spec)2023 Kia Sportage (European spec)
There are also multiple controls on the steering wheel together with a rotary dial for the gear selector, below which is a second dial for the drive mode selector. One of the modes is a Terrain Mode that automatically adjusts several vehicle settings to improve stability on uneven or slippery surfaces, including snow, mud and sand. X-Pro models introduce some off-road hardware including 17-inch BF Goodrich all-terrain tires, heated windshield and wiper naxxles, and LED fog lights.
2023 Kia Sportage (European spec)
Sportage powertrains will be twinning with new Hyundai Tucson introduced for 2022, whose underpinnings are shared with the new Sportage. A 2.5-liter inline-4 with 187 hp as standard and will be the only engine at launch. It’s mated to an 8-speed automatic. Front-wheel drive is standard while all-wheel drive will be available. Eventually a pair of hybrids, one a plug-in hybrid, will arrive with a 1.6-liter turbocharged inline-4 mated to a single electric motor integrated with a 6-speed automatic. The regular hybrid setup is good for 226 hp while the plug-in hybrid setup is good for 261 hp in the Sportage’s cousin, the Hyundai Tucson. The plug-in hybrid also has a 13.8-kilowatt-hour battery that will deliver an estimated 32 miles of electric range in the Tucson.
Every 2023 Sportage will come standard with automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, lane keep assist, and rear parking sensors. Blind-spot monitors, rear cross-traffic alerts, front parking sensors, adaptive cruise control, and a driver assist system will be available.
For more on the Kia Sportage, read the in-depth reviews at The Car Connection.

2005 Porsche Carrera GT for sale with 342 miles

2005 Porsche Carrera GT for sale with 342 miles

If you have the desire (and the funds) to own one of Porsche’s most legendary supercars, you’d better act fast. A one-owner 2005 Porsche Carrera GT with just 342 miles on the odometer is up for auction through P Car Market, but the auction ends in just two days.
First spotted by Jalopnik, this GT Silver Metallic car is one of just 1,270 built between 2003 and 2006. Of that total, just 644 were imported to the U.S.
Unveiled at the 2000 Paris Motor Show, the Carrera GT was originally just a concept car that wasn’t intended for production. However, Porsche had a V-10 engine on hand from an aborted Le Mans project, and soon became flush with cash from the introduction of the Cayenne.
2005 Porsche Carrera GT (photo via P Car Market)
Originally developed in the 1990s for Formula One, and then repurposed for a Le Mans program that never happened, the V-10 ultimately displaced 5.7-liters in road-car form. It produced 603 hp and 435 lb-ft of torque, which was channeled to the rear wheels through a 6-speed manual transmission.
A carbon-fiber monocoque kept the Carrera GT’s curb weight down to 3,042 lb. That allowed for 0-62 mph in 3.9 seconds—still an incredible number for a naturally aspirated car with a manual transmission—as well as 0-124 mph in 9.9 seconds, and a 205-mph top speed.
The car up for auction—chassis 0855—was delivered through a Texas dealership and has been in the original owner’s collection since new, according to the listing, which also noted that the Carrera GT recently had a “preventative” $50,000 engine-out service. The high bid was around $1.33 million at the time of publication, meaning this car is on track to set a sales record. Last month, a Carrera GT with 2,700 miles set a record of $1.31 million on Bring a Trailer, Jalopnik noted.

2023 Audi Q9 spy shots: Full-size SUV in the works?

2023 Audi Q9 spy shots: Full-size SUV in the works?

Most of the major luxury brands now offer full-size SUVs but the option is still missing at Audi, though that situation may change in the near future.
Audi engineers are testing a prototype for a full-size SUV. Although in many circles it is being referred to as a Q9, the vehicle may end up being called a Q7 L, or perhaps Q8 L.
We still can’t rule out the name Q9, though. Audi filed trademarks for the name as early as 2013, and the automaker’s executives have previously hinted at the need for an SUV bigger than the Q7 and Q8.
There’s also a good chance that the mystery SUV will be sold in China only. Audi already offers a handful of Chinese-exclusive models, and more are planned. Coming up next is a Q5 E-Tron.
2023 Audi Q9 spy shots – Photo credit: S. Baldauf/SB-Medien
But getting back to this mystery SUV. An earlier tester used a Volkswagen Atlas body to hide its new mechanicals. The Atlas uses a stretched version of Volkswagen Group’s MQB platform designed for mainstream cars but any Audi full-size SUV would likely ride on a stretched version of the premium MLB Evo platform found in several Audis, including the Q7 and Q8.
We currently expect this mystery SUV to be revealed in late 2022 or early the following year.
Don’t be surprised if additional Volkswagen Group brands launch their own full-size SUVs to help spread the investment cost of this Audi. Bentley CEO Adrian Hallmark last year hinted strongly that an SUV will fill the void of the Mulsanne as the brand’s future flagship, and Volkswagen in 2016 rolled out the T-Prime Concept GTE and confirmed plans for a production model. The T-Prime is a full-size SUV measuring 11 inches longer than the latest Touareg.
Stay tuned for updates as development continues.

2022 Land Rover Range Rover, 2023 Chevy Corvette Z06, 2023 Ford Escape: Today's Car News

2022 Land Rover Range Rover, 2023 Chevy Corvette Z06, 2023 Ford Escape: Today's Car News

Land Rover has redesigned the Range Rover, with the new fifth-generation model to arrive at dealerships next spring as a 2022 model. While the exterior styling hasn’t changed all that much, underneath is a new platform that supports battery-electric powertrains and perhaps eventually hydrogen-electric powertrains.
Chevrolet’s new Corvette Z06 has finally landed. The big news is the car’s 5.5-liter V-8 which features a flat-plane crankshaft and double overhead cams. The engine is related to the unit in the Corvette C8.R race car, and is the most powerful naturally aspirated V-8 in production thanks to its 670-hp output.
A camouflaged prototype for an updated Ford Escape, a Kuga in some markets, has been spotted testing. The popular compact crossover is set to take on a tougher look that resembles the design of the Mustang Mach-E, and we should see it reach dealerships next year as a 2023 mode.
You’ll find these stories and more in today’s car news, right here at Motor Authority.
2022 Land Rover Range Rover shapes its future with plug-in power
2023 Chevy Corvette Z06 revealed with 670-hp LT6 V-8
2023 Ford Escape spy shots: Major facelift on the way
IIHS raises Top Safety Pick bar with tougher side crash test
Electric Range Rover due in 2024 could spawn hydrogen option
Hyundai Mobis “e-corner” modules would enable crab mode, rotational parking in future EVs
Tuning potential of 2022 Honda Civic Si to be on full display at SEMA show
Volvo expands recall of older sedans and wagons for airbag issue
CEO of McLaren’s road car division steps down
Canoo Lifestyle Vehicle will get Panasonic cylindrical cells for its structural battery approach

CEO of McLaren's supercar division steps down

CEO of McLaren's supercar division steps down

Mike Flewitt is stepping down as chief executive officer at McLaren Automotive, the supercar business of McLaren Group.
Flewitt first joined McLaren Automotive in 2012 and was promoted to the CEO role in 2013.
The role will be filled by Michael Macht, a non-executive director at McLaren Group and a former CEO of Porsche, until a replacement for Flewitt can be found.
“I feel incredibly proud to have led McLaren Automotive through most of its first, highly successful decade and am privileged to have played a part in the incredible McLaren story,” Flewitt said in a statement released on Wednesday.
McLaren Automotive was only established in 2010 but already has a collection of supercars that are as desirable as models from Ferrari and Lamborghini, both of which have been in the business for decades. McLaren also outsells Lamborghini when it comes to supercar sales.
As CEO, Flewitt was influential in that success, though he has also been criticized for replacing models too quickly, and as a result hurting resale values. In the early months of the pandemic, Flewitt announced that McLaren Automotive would slow its aggressive Track25 plan which called for 18 new cars or derivatives to be launched in the space of about seven years.
McLaren Automotive has also struggled much more than rivals in dealing with the pandemic. In the past year, the company has had to shed workers, and its McLaren Group parent has had to sell and lease back its headquarters, sell a stake in its Formula One team, and sell its McLaren Applied technology business. The company also needed additional investment from main shareholder Bahrain and new shareholder Saudi Arabia.

Tuning potential of 2022 Honda Civic Si to be on full display at SEMA show

Tuning potential of 2022 Honda Civic Si to be on full display at SEMA show

Honda has a redesigned 2022 Civic Si headed to showrooms later this year, and it’s safe to say that a significant number of buyers plan to modify the car at some point during their ownership.
Honda and its various performance partners will use the upcoming SEMA show to preview the tuning potential of the new Civic Si, as well as a handful of other Honda models. The Japanese automaker will also show off a Civic Si-based race car that HPD has developed for entry-level touring car racing.
HPD 2022 Honda Civic Si – 2021 SEMA show
HPD 2022 Honda Civic Si: Perhaps the most attractive of Honda’s bevy of Civic Si SEMA show cars to a general audience is the road car developed by HPD. It features a number of standard mods that we could imagine being offered via Honda dealerships. The list includes a front splitter, side skirts, and rear spoiler, as well as 18-inch alloys finished in black and featuring black lug nuts.
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HPD Honda Civic Si Race Car Prototype: Another build that we’re sure will be a fan favorite is a new race car developed by HPD for entry-level touring car racing. The turn-key racer features the same 1.5-liter turbocharged inline-4 as the road car but with a new ECU, extra cooling, and a high-flow exhaust. The chassis has also been tuned for the racetrack.
Team Honda Research West Honda Civic Si Race Car – 2021 SEMA show
Team Honda Research West Honda Civic Si Race Car: The folks at Team Honda Research West have also developed a race car based on the new Civic Si, this one to compete in the 2021 25 Hours of Thunderhill endurance race which runs December 3-5 at California’s Thunderhill Raceway Park. It’s much closer in spec to the road car compared to HPD’s racer above, as only mild upgrades have been made to the powertrain.
Team Liquid 2022 Honda Civic Hatchback – 2021 SEMA show
Team Liquid 2022 Honda Civic Hatchback: Honda will have other models present at the SEMA show. One of them will be a Civic Hatchback developed in partnership with gaming community Team Liquid. The vehicle sports a number of HPD upgrades and Honda accessories, including some aero elements and a roof-mounted storage box.
Honda Passport TrailSport Rugged Roads Project 2.0 – 2021 SEMA show
Honda Passport TrailSport Rugged Roads Project 2.0: For overlanding enthusiasts, Honda will present a build based on the new 2022 Passport TrailSport. It’s an evolution of the Passport-based overlanding build shown in September, and features a Jsport suspension lift kit and 18-inch wheels wrapped in Firestone Destination A/T2 all-terrain tires. Another key upgrade are the skid plates for the fuel tank and oil pan.
Honda Ridgeline HPD Trail Tour Project Vehicle – 2021 SEMA show
Honda Ridgeline HPD Trail Tour Project Vehicle: Pickup fans can look forward to a custom Ridgeline, also built for overlanding. It features similar upgrades to the Passport Trailsport above, along with bed and rooftop accessories from Thule and a custom spare tire carrier from Jsport. It’s based on the 2021 Ridgeline with the HPD Option Package.
Honda Fifteen52 Project 96 Accord Wagon – 2021 SEMA show
Honda Fifteen52 Project 96 Accord Wagon: Another build that’s sure to attract plenty of attention is a 1996 Accord wagon with an engine borrowed from the modern Civic Type R. The 306-hp engine was previously available to Honda Racing Line members and race teams, but is now available to anyone. The package comes with an engine long block, alternator, turbocharger, and starter motor. Also included is a Controls Package which features an HPD-developed ECU, engine swap harness, and accelerator pedal.
The 2021 SEMA show runs November 2-5 in Las Vegas. For our full coverage, head to our dedicated hub.

Electric Range Rover due in 2024 could spawn hydrogen option

Electric Range Rover due in 2024 could spawn hydrogen option

Land Rover on Tuesday unveiled a redesigned Range Rover.
It’s due at dealerships next spring as a 2022 model and will initially offer a mild-hybrid powertrain that uses a 3.0-liter inline-6 as the internal-combustion component, and generates a peak 395 hp.
A plug-in hybrid option will be added for the 2023 model year. This option is confirmed to deliver 434 hp and will likely add a more powerful electric motor to the inline-6.
Land Rover has confirmed that a battery-electric Range Rover will arrive sometime during 2024, but has provided no further details.
2022 Land Rover Range Rover (New)
Interestingly, Autocar has learned from Nick Miller, Land Rover’s program director, that a hydrogen-electric Range Rover using a fuel cell is also possible. Such technology is supported by the redesigned Range Rover’s MLA platform and is already being tested in a Defender-based prototype. A concept is also expected to be revealed in the near future.
According to Miller, Land Rover sees hydrogen as “complementary” to batteries in its quest to reach zero emissions by 2036.
In hydrogen-electric vehicles, stored hydrogen is combined with oxygen from the air in a fuel cell which then generates electricity and leaves only water as the byproduct. The generated electricity is used to power electric motors driving the wheels, as well as charge a relatively small battery that can help power the electric motors during high-load situations.
The problem with hydrogen-electric vehicles is the limited availability of hydrogen, which is why Land Rover will initially focus on battery-electric vehicles. The automaker has plans to launch six of them by as early as 2026. And by 2030, every Land Rover vehicle should have an electric option.

2023 Ford Escape spy shots: Major facelift on the way

2023 Ford Escape spy shots: Major facelift on the way

Ford’s Escape is set to come in for a major facelift, as evidenced by a camouflaged prototype recently spotted in the wild.
The current Escape, known as a Kuga in some markets, was introduced for the 2020 model year with a rather lukewarm design that was made even more forgettable with the launch of the related Bronco Sport a year later.
Ford looks to be addressing this shortcoming with a mid-cycle update for the compact crossover. The rounded front end of the current Escape will make way for a tougher, blockier look on the updated model. The headlights are also new and the grille now sits higher and features the Ford logo sitting center. Currently the logo sits on the leading edge of the hood.
The overall result should be something more closely resembling the Mustang Mach-E.
2023 Ford Escape (Kuga) facelift spy shots – Photo credit: S. Baldauf/SB-Medien
The changes to the rear styling will be less dramatic. It looks like there will be a revised fascia and likely a new design for the exhaust tips. The exhaust design shown on the prototype is only a makeshift unit.
The dash was also heavily concealed, according to our photographer, which points to major changes taking place inside as well. Don’t be surprised if a larger infotainment screen is added, something we’ve seen with the updated version of the related Focus that was just launched overseas.
It isn’t clear what Ford has planned for the powertrains. The current Escape has a relatively diverse lineup starting with a 1.5-liter turbocharged inline-3 good for 181 hp. A 2.0-liter turbocharged inline-4 offers a meatier 250 hp, and for fuel-conscious buyers there is a 2.5-liter inline-4 offered in hybrid and plug-in hybrid configurations. They offer up 200 and 221 hp, respectively.
Look for the updated Escape to arrive in 2022 as a 2023 model.

2022 Land Rover Range Rover shapes its future with plug-in power

2022 Land Rover Range Rover shapes its future with plug-in power

A new Land Rover Range Rover arrives for the 2022 model year. With it, the off-road luxury wagon will mark a few firsts, and the return of some familiar features. 
On the latter, the next Range Rover will revive Land Rover’s links with BMW. Most versions tap a potent BMW-sourced twin-turbo V-8 for power. On the former, the base Range Rover now comes with a mild-hybrid powertrain standard; plug-in hybrids arrive soon, with a full electric Range Rover due to arrive in 2024.
There’s also a new seven-seat, long-wheelbase model that should give the Range Rover one of the few things it’s lacked—critical now that the landscape of luxury SUVs includes everything from Uruses and Bentaygas to Wagoneers, Escalades, and Navigators.
2022 Land Rover Range Rover (New)2022 Land Rover Range Rover (New)2022 Land Rover Range Rover (New)
Range Rover styling: New matters 
Against the progressive design of the last-generation Range Rover, the new SUV’s look offers a more subtle advance from nearly every angle. 
The outline changes little from the recent versions of the Range Rover, and if the prior version seemed restrained, the new one’s almost shorn of extraneous detail.
“What is there is there for a reason,” Design Director Jerry McGovern explained during a recent showing of the 2022 Range Rover in New York. The new vehicle is flush with detail but without the usual heavy SUV surfacing. Rectangles perforate the grille and brightwork blends into the lower bumper, in tandem with nearly flush side glass. A thin line slices from nose to tail just under a shoulder line that omits the usual bright trim on its way to meet a gently sloped roofline. If the last Range Rover had sculptural qualities, this one’s overtly sculpture. 
At its front door hinges, the SUV wears U-shaped metallic trim that doesn’t seem to have a pure purpose. It’s for aesthetics, McGovern backtracked, “because that is a function” as well. 
At its rear, the Range Rover has a set of vertical blade-style taillights. It’s the most overt exterior cue to the design influence of electric cars. Inside, it’s easy to spot those cues, though it’s more of a gradual change than in, say, a Cadillac Lyriq. The Range Rover’s crisply drawn cabin has the airy and spare feel of a modern media wall, with a curved 13.1-inch touchscreen plunked on its smoothly leathered surface like the Prada art installation that stands on a stretch of Texas road outside Marfa. A 13.7-inch screen displays gauges. Trimmed with woven Kvadrat upholstery or leather, inlaid with copper or wood trim (or both), and fitted with ceramic-covered control knobs from the new SV design themes, the Range Rover’s new cabin radiates an urbane glow, as if it’s an extension of a tony loft.
Of course, it could seem awfully familiar to buyers shopping the new Hummer EV or the Rivian R1S, or even a Lyriq. Not every luxury SUV shopper wants glamour to be the unifying commodity that shrouds them through life. Some of them want quite the opposite. 
2022 Land Rover Range Rover (Technology)2022 Land Rover Range Rover (Technology)2022 Land Rover Range Rover (Technology)2022 Land Rover Range Rover (Technology)
Range Rover performance: Bring on the volts
The new shapes usher in a new powertrain future for the Range Rover. Not only will this be the first Range Rover to ride on 23-inch wheels, it’ll be the first to come with battery-only power. That version’s due to arrive in 2024, and no further details have been confirmed.
A plug-in hybrid arrives before the Range Rover EV, in the 2023 model year. In that vehicle, Land Rover promises up to 62 miles (on the WLTP cycle) of plug-in driving thanks to a 38.2-kwh lithium-ion battery pack and a 105-kw electric motor. Rated at 434 hp net, the powertrain can run on electric alone at speeds of up to 87 mph. On a 50-kw charger, it can be juiced up in about five hours.
Before that arrives, the 2022 Range Rover adopts the brand’s current mild-hybrid turbo-6 powertrain with 395 hp and 406 lb-ft of torque, shuttled through an 8-speed automatic. That’s offered only in the SE trim; every other Range Rover for the 2022 model year will offer a BMW-sourced 4.4-liter twin-turbo V-8 good for 523 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque. If that recalls powertrains from the era when BMW owned Land Rover, so will its performance data: Land Rover predicts a 0-60 mph time for V-8 Range Rovers of 4.6 seconds.
With its hallmark all-wheel-drive system, six-mode terrain-management system, and active locking rear differential, the Range Rover doesn’t backtrack from its off-road roots. It can disconnect its front wheels for better fuel economy, for sure—but still sports up to 11.6 inches of ground clearance in its highest air-suspension setting. It takes on more technology to bridge the gulf between rock-climbing and stair-stepping at 24 Hour Fitness, too: it now has twin-valve Bilstein dampers for finer body control, a 48-volt electronic anti-roll system, and it now links two miles’ worth of navigation data with its suspension to predict and adaptively damp the vehicle for the road ahead.
All-wheel steering gives up to seven degrees of opposite steer to the rear wheels at low speeds, which leads to a turning circle of 36 feet and, Land Rover claims, much better high-speed stability when the rears steer with the fronts.
2022 Land Rover Range Rover (Technology)2022 Land Rover Range Rover (New)2022 Land Rover Range Rover SV
Range Rover comfort, safety, and features: more seats, more sense
The 2022 Range Rover won’t lack for many features, and for the first time up to seven passengers will be able to enjoy them. Most versions remain five-seat SUVs, but some long-wheelbase Range Rovers can be fitted with a third-row seat that’s large enough to cosset 6-foot-tall passengers in style, with good knee and head room and a leather headliner.
It’s made possible by a body that’s grown substantially. The standard Range Rover has added about three inches in wheelbase, while the stretched version gains about eight inches. A new adjustable cargo floor can partition off that space for more organized feats of packing people and luggage behind the split tailgate, too. Outfitted as a four-seat executive edition, saddled with a rear-mounted “event seating” fold-away bench, and shod with pop-out wood-trimmed snack tracks, it’s a mobile VIP lounge missing only the boarding announcements.
The $105,350 2022 Range Rover SE has five seats and a mild-hybrid powertrain. It’s $6,000 more for the long-wheelbase body and two more seats, and $14,700 more than the base price to add the twin-turbo V-8. All versions have leather upholstery, satellite radio hardware, wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and wireless smartphone charging.
All other models come with the twin-turbo V-8 standard. The $153,350 Autobiography five-seater can be upgraded to the long wheelbase and seven seats for $6,000 more. A First Edition costs $159,550 in standard spec or $5,300 more for the long-wheelbase body. More plush models can come with a 1,600-watt Meridian sound system and active noise cancellation, power-assist doors, twin rear-seat entertainment screens, and a surround-view camera system. At the top of the lineup a new Range Rover SV series offers extended selections of leather and interior trim, and special paint schemes streamlined to SV Serenity and SV Intrepid themes, as well as a Signature Suite configuration with 24-way power-adjustable massaging seats and power-deployed tray tables. By then, you’re well into the $200,000 range.
The 2022 Range Rover is on sale now and deliveries are expected by spring of 2022. The prior version of the SUV will also be sold as a 2022 model, side by side with the new.

Preview: 2022 Land Rover Range Rover shapes its future with plug-in power

Preview: 2022 Land Rover Range Rover shapes its future with plug-in power

A new Land Rover Range Rover arrives for the 2022 model year. With it, the off-road luxury wagon will mark a few firsts, and the return of some familiar features. 
On the latter, the next Range Rover will revive Land Rover’s links with BMW. Most versions tap a potent BMW-sourced twin-turbo V-8 for power. On the former, the base Range Rover now comes with a mild-hybrid powertrain standard; plug-in hybrids arrive soon, with a full electric Range Rover due to arrive in 2024.
There’s also a new seven-seat, long-wheelbase model that should give the Range Rover one of the few things it’s lacked—critical now that the landscape of luxury SUVs includes everything from Uruses and Bentaygas to Wagoneers, Escalades, and Navigators.
2022 Land Rover Range Rover (New)2022 Land Rover Range Rover (New)2022 Land Rover Range Rover (New)
Range Rover styling: New matters 
Against the progressive design of the last-generation Range Rover, the new SUV’s look offers a more subtle advance from nearly every angle. 
The outline changes little from the recent versions of the Range Rover, and if the prior version seemed restrained, the new one’s almost shorn of extraneous detail.
“What is there is there for a reason,” Design Director Jerry McGovern explained during a recent showing of the 2022 Range Rover in New York. The new vehicle is flush with detail but without the usual heavy SUV surfacing. Rectangles perforate the grille and brightwork blends into the lower bumper, in tandem with nearly flush side glass. A thin line slices from nose to tail just under a shoulder line that omits the usual bright trim on its way to meet a gently sloped roofline. If the last Range Rover had sculptural qualities, this one’s overtly sculpture. 
At its front door hinges, the SUV wears U-shaped metallic trim that doesn’t seem to have a pure purpose. It’s for aesthetics, McGovern backtracked, “because that is a function” as well. 
At its rear, the Range Rover has a set of vertical blade-style taillights. It’s the most overt exterior cue to the design influence of electric cars. Inside, it’s easy to spot those cues, though it’s more of a gradual change than in, say, a Cadillac Lyriq. The Range Rover’s crisply drawn cabin has the airy and spare feel of a modern media wall, with a curved 13.1-inch touchscreen plunked on its smoothly leathered surface like the Prada art installation that stands on a stretch of Texas road outside Marfa. A 13.7-inch screen displays gauges. Trimmed with woven Kvadrat upholstery or leather, inlaid with copper or wood trim (or both), and fitted with ceramic-covered control knobs from the new SV design themes, the Range Rover’s new cabin radiates an urbane glow, as if it’s an extension of a tony loft.
Of course, it could seem awfully familiar to buyers shopping the new Hummer EV or the Rivian R1S, or even a Lyriq. Not every luxury SUV shopper wants glamour to be the unifying commodity that shrouds them through life. Some of them want quite the opposite. 
2022 Land Rover Range Rover (Technology)2022 Land Rover Range Rover (Technology)2022 Land Rover Range Rover (Technology)2022 Land Rover Range Rover (Technology)
Range Rover performance: Bring on the volts
The new shapes usher in a new powertrain future for the Range Rover. Not only will this be the first Range Rover to ride on 23-inch wheels, it’ll be the first to come with battery-only power. That version’s due to arrive in 2024, and no further details have been confirmed.
A plug-in hybrid arrives before the Range Rover EV, in the 2023 model year. In that vehicle, Land Rover promises up to 62 miles (on the WLTP cycle) of plug-in driving thanks to a 38.2-kwh lithium-ion battery pack and a 105-kw electric motor. Rated at 434 hp net, the powertrain can run on electric alone at speeds of up to 87 mph. On a 50-kw charger, it can be juiced up in about five hours.
Before that arrives, the 2022 Range Rover adopts the brand’s current mild-hybrid turbo-6 powertrain with 395 hp and 406 lb-ft of torque, shuttled through an 8-speed automatic. That’s offered only in the SE trim; every other Range Rover for the 2022 model year will offer a BMW-sourced 4.4-liter twin-turbo V-8 good for 523 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque. If that recalls powertrains from the era when BMW owned Land Rover, so will its performance data: Land Rover predicts a 0-60 mph time for V-8 Range Rovers of 4.6 seconds.
With its hallmark all-wheel-drive system, six-mode terrain-management system, and active locking rear differential, the Range Rover doesn’t backtrack from its off-road roots. It can disconnect its front wheels for better fuel economy, for sure—but still sports up to 11.6 inches of ground clearance in its highest air-suspension setting. It takes on more technology to bridge the gulf between rock-climbing and stair-stepping at 24 Hour Fitness, too: it now has twin-valve Bilstein dampers for finer body control, a 48-volt electronic anti-roll system, and it now links two miles’ worth of navigation data with its suspension to predict and adaptively damp the vehicle for the road ahead.
All-wheel steering gives up to seven degrees of opposite steer to the rear wheels at low speeds, which leads to a turning circle of 36 feet and, Land Rover claims, much better high-speed stability when the rears steer with the fronts.
2022 Land Rover Range Rover (Technology)2022 Land Rover Range Rover (New)2022 Land Rover Range Rover SV
Range Rover comfort, safety, and features: more seats, more sense
The 2022 Range Rover won’t lack for many features, and for the first time up to seven passengers will be able to enjoy them. Most versions remain five-seat SUVs, but some long-wheelbase Range Rovers can be fitted with a third-row seat that’s large enough to cosset 6-foot-tall passengers in style, with good knee and head room and a leather headliner.
It’s made possible by a body that’s grown substantially. The standard Range Rover has added about three inches in wheelbase, while the stretched version gains about eight inches. A new adjustable cargo floor can partition off that space for more organized feats of packing people and luggage behind the split tailgate, too. Outfitted as a four-seat executive edition, saddled with a rear-mounted “event seating” fold-away bench, and shod with pop-out wood-trimmed snack tracks, it’s a mobile VIP lounge missing only the boarding announcements.
The $105,350 2022 Range Rover SE has five seats and a mild-hybrid powertrain. It’s $6,000 more for the long-wheelbase body and two more seats, and $14,700 more than the base price to add the twin-turbo V-8. All versions have leather upholstery, satellite radio hardware, wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and wireless smartphone charging.
All other models come with the twin-turbo V-8 standard. The $153,350 Autobiography five-seater can be upgraded to the long wheelbase and seven seats for $6,000 more. A First Edition costs $159,550 in standard spec or $5,300 more for the long-wheelbase body. More plush models can come with a 1,600-watt Meridian sound system and active noise cancellation, power-assist doors, twin rear-seat entertainment screens, and a surround-view camera system. At the top of the lineup a new Range Rover SV series offers extended selections of leather and interior trim, and special paint schemes streamlined to SV Serenity and SV Intrepid themes, as well as a Signature Suite configuration with 24-way power-adjustable massaging seats and power-deployed tray tables. By then, you’re well into the $200,000 range.
The 2022 Range Rover is on sale now and deliveries are expected by spring of 2022. The prior version of the SUV will also be sold as a 2022 model, side by side with the new.

1990 Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 experimental active suspension prototype for sale

1990 Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 experimental active suspension prototype for sale

A 1990 Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 prototype used to develop an experimental active suspension system is currently up for sale through Hemmings.
According to the listing, the black ‘Vette was one of four survivors of a group of 25 prototypes from the active-suspension project. That project was a joint effort with Lotus, which was owned by GM at the time and was heavily involved in the development of the C4 ZR-1.
While active suspensions are used on some road cars today, they were strictly the purview of Formula One race cars in 1990. GM sought to adapt the technology from the the Lotus F1 program to road cars. The system used hydraulics and a Delco computer to adapt to road conditions, improve lateral handling, and balance the car in corners. GM torture tested the prototypes in both Germany and at Daytona International Speedway, where cars averaged 175 mph over 24 hours with stops only for fuel and driver changes. The listing claims it would have been the most advanced suspension system to date and would have sent the ZR-1’s price to $150,000, which proved too costly to put into production.
1990 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 active suspension prototype (photo via Hemmings)
This car is identifiable as one of the 25 prototypes by its chassis number, 3,000-psi hydraulic system, and Delco computer, according to the listing. It’s being offered for sale by a Miami dealer.
The asking price of $89,500 is a bit higher than the $75,000 another ZR-1 prototype brought at auction in late 2020. That car was used by Lotus for engine-calibration testing, and is one of only two from its group to survive, according to its seller.
Even without active suspension, the C4 ZR-1 marked a new era for Corvette performance. Its LT5 5.7-liter V-8 produced 380 hp at launch, and was later upgraded to 405 hp. Production ended in 1995, but the name lived on (minus the hyphen) with the C6 Corvette ZR1 and 755-hp C7 Corvette ZR1, which we named Motor Authority’s Best Car To Buy 2019. The C7 ZR1 is the most powerful production Corvette to date, but we expect it to be surpassed by the rumored C8 ZR1, which could boast up to 850 hp.

Pure V-12 Lamborghinis sold out ahead of electrified future

Pure V-12 Lamborghinis sold out ahead of electrified future

The Lamborghini Aventador and Lamborghini itself have reached the end of an era. The Aventador LP 780-4 Ultimae, which Lamborghini claims will be its last non-electrified V-12 supercar, has officially sold out.
In a press release discussing sales, Lamborghini confirmed that both the Ultimae and the Countach LPI 800-4 hybrid have sold out. The Ultimae is arriving as a coupe or roadster, with production capped at 350 units and 250 units, respectively. Production of the coupe-only Countach LPI 800-4 is limited to 112 units.
Unveiled earlier this year, the Ultimae is powered by the same 6.5-liter V-12 used in all other versions of the Aventador. However, it’s tuned to deliver 769 hp and 531 lb-ft of torque via tweaks to the valve timing. The peak power is the highest of any Aventador road car, and it arrives at a screaming 8,500 rpm.
Lamborghini Countach LPI 800-4
Power is routed to all four wheels through a 7-speed independent shifting rod transmission. Lamborghini quotes 0-62 mph times of 2.8 seconds for the coupe and 2.9 seconds for the roadster, with a 220-mph top speed.
The Countach LPI 800-4 is based on the Aventador, and also uses the 6.5-liter V-12, but here it’s teamed with a hybrid powertrain similar to the one used in the Lamborghini Sián. Peak output is 803 hp (compared to the Sián’s 807 hp). Lamborghini quotes the same 0-62 mph time as the Aventador Ultimae coupe, and a 221-mph top speed.
While the Ultimae is billed as the last pure V-12 Lamborghini, the automaker isn’t done with these engines. An Aventador successor due in 2023 is expected to use a newly developed V-12, which will only be the third V-12 in Lamborghini’s entire history. However, it’s expected to be part of a plug-in hybrid powertrain.